Category Archives: support scams

‘AdultSwine’ – Android malware with a dirty mind

The Register: ‘Mummy, what’s felching?’ Tot gets smut served by Android app – Google’s Play Store fails again

Actually, I didn’t know about felching, either, and I wish I hadn’t looked it up.

Based on Checkpoint’s blog article Malware Displaying Porn Ads Discovered in Game Apps on Google Play. Checkpoint says that this is a triple-threat attack: it may display ads that are often (very) pornographic, engineer users into installing fake security apps, and/or induce them to register with premium services.

David Harley

Tech support scams: alive, kicking, and audio talking trash

Paul Ducklin for Sophos: Watch out – fake support scams are alive and well this Christmas

The first part of the article is a recap of old-school tech support scam cold-calling, but the rest describes what happened when someone clicked on ‘one of those “you’ll never believe what happened next” stories’. The resulting ‘alert’ included an automatic voice-over. While the voice-over (which you can hear on the page above) is full of laughable transcription errors and false information, it could certainly scare someone not particularly tech-literate into falling for the scam.

David Harley

Tech Support Scams: leveraging Spotify for Google and Bing SEO

Lawrence Abrams for Bleeping Computer: Tech Support Scammers Invade Spotify Forums to Rank in Search Engines

Extract: “Over the past few months, Tech Support scammers have been using the Spotify forums to inject their phone numbers into the first page of the Google & Bing search results. They do this by submitting a constant stream of spam posts to the Spotify forums, whose pages tend to rank well in Google.”

David Harley

Fake BSOD, Fake Tech Support

Tara Seals for Infosecurity Magazine: Tech Support Scam Malware Fakes the Blue Screen of Death

“The infamous Blue Screen of Death (BSOD) is one of the most-dreaded sights for Windows users. Adding insult to injury, a new malware is making the rounds that fakes a BSOD, and then tries to swindle victims into paying for tech support tools.”

Malwarebytes describes ‘Troubleshooter’ as a hijacker, but it’s one of those instances where a tech support scam edges close to ransomware.

David Harley

Streamlining a Tech Support Scam

Microsoft’s Windows Security Blog on Technet: New tech support scam launches communication or phone call app

“A new tech support scam technique streamlines the entire scam experience, leaving potential victims only one click or tap away from speaking with a scammer. We recently found a new tech support scam website that opens your default communication or phone call app, automatically prompting you to call a fake tech support scam hotline.”

The scam is supplemented by an audio message from ‘Apple Support’ (yeah, right…) that threatens to ‘disable and suspend your Mac device’ if the prospective victim closes the ‘alert’ window. However, the scam is ‘optimized for mobile phones’.

Commentary from Zeljka Zorz for HelpNet: New scam launches users’ default phone app, points it to fake tech support hotline

David Harley

Tech Support Scammers Target BT Customers

Well, this isn’t the first time. But a report by Kat Hall for The Register suggests that some of the scammers may have more information about potential victims than they should. Which makes me wonder whether there’s a leak similar to that affecting TalkTalk customers. I’ve certainly been contacted in the past by BT sales people who were clearly not based in the UK.

I don’t know whether there’s been such a leak at BT, of course. However, it’s not unknown for people working in legitimate support to be also implicated in some way in support scamming, whether by leaking data or by working in a call centre that encourages scam calling as well as offering legit support for legit organizations. And it’s hard to police that kind of activity.

That article by Kat Hall: Indian call centre scammers are targeting BT customers – In some cases fraudsters knew their mark’s personal details

David Harley

Tech support scams – FTC offers money back…

…well, there’s no foolproof way of doing that (getting your money back, that is), unfortunately. But Shaun Nichols reports for The Register that FTC ready to give back tech support scamming money to the bilked.

“Those who have been identified as eligible by the FTC will get an email from the commission with a PIN number that can be used to obtain the claim forms. In order to claim a share of the payout, consumers will have to fill out a claim before October 27.”

The article does, very sensibly, point out the risk that scammers will use the FTC’s initiative as a springboard for further scams. Unfortunately, I can’t predict exactly what form such scams will take, but I’d be surprised if they don’t happen…

The Federal Trade Commission’s own press release is here: FTC Announces Refund Process for Victims of Deceptive Tech Support Operation.

It states:

Eligible consumers bought tech support products and services between April 2012 and November 2014 from Advanced Tech Support, which also used the name Inbound Call Experts. Consumers will have until October 27, 2017 to submit a request for a refund.

David Harley

Talk Talk fined for support scam issue

The Register: TalkTalk fined £100k for exposing personal sensitive info – 21,000 accounts handled by Indian outsourcing biz exposed

‘…TalkTalk found an issue with the UK ISP’s portal … One of the companies with access to the portal was Wipro, a multinational IT services company in India that resolved high level complaints and addressed network coverage problems on TalkTalk’s behalf … three Wipro accounts … had been used to gain unauthorised and unlawful access to the personal data of up to 21,000 customers.’

See also TalkTalk confesses: Scammers have data about our engineers’ visits to your home Info exploited, say customers

Added to tech support resources page, of course.

David Harley