Tag Archives: David Harley

ESET: Key Insights & Key Card Ransomware

ESET’s WeLiveSecurity blog put together an article combining commentary from Stephen Cobb, Lysa Myers and myself: Ransomware: Key insights from infosec experts.

Yesterday, the site also commented on a story – Austrian hotel experiences ‘ransomware of things attack’ – that I also touched upon for ITSecurity UK: Key Card Ransomware: News versus FUD.

David Harley

Be Prepared

…and ordinarily, there’d be a witty allusion here to Tom Lehrer, who used the same title for one of his songs, but there’s a very serious edge to this post.

The part of the world I live in is mostly spared (touch wood) the sort of dramatic, extreme disaster that I sometimes discuss here in the context of disaster-related scams, blackhat SEO and so forth. Even flooding in the often-rainsoaked UK lacks drama compared to the impact it has in other parts of the world. But it’s depressing to think how much of my security writing in recent years has related to criminal exploitation of the 2004 and other tsunami, earthquakes and so on, and at the beginning of September I’m addressing the topic again at the CFET 2011 conference in the UK.

Many of my friends, acquaintances and readers are rather more used to the risk and reality of earthquakes, tsunami, forest fire, eruptions and so on, not least those who are situated close to the Pacific “Ring of Fire”, which has 75% of the world’s active and dormant volcanoes and experiences 80% of its largest earthquakes, and includes most of the West coasts of North and South America. However, a glance at the links on the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s page at http://www.fema.gov/ demonstrates that the US population as a whole is at enough risk from national disasters to justify the existence of the National Prepared Month Coalition. AVIEN’s US subscribers may well want to think about supporting the initiative (it’s free, it isn’t restricted to USians, and it gives access to some resources you may find especially useful in the US).

The point I really want to get over here, though, is less this particular initiative (though AVIEN does support it as a member, so you may hear more of this from me) than the importance of training for disaster as a mindset that we can all benefit from, even if we don’t live too close for comfort to a major fault line, like my colleagues in San Diego. Disaster is a beast with many faces, and not all disasters are “natural”.

Tip of the hat to Robert Slade for turning my attention to the issue (not for the first time, of course) .

David Harley CITP FBCS CISSP
Small Blue-Green World/AVIEN
ESET Senior Research Fellow

Status Epsilon-icus*

Ok. That wasn’t the last update.

And very possibly the last update here (the target blog suggests why…): Epsilon Overkill and the Security Ecology

Update 3: Rebecca Herson evaluates some of the advice given by Epsilon customers for coping with the phlurry of phish anticipated post-Epsilon: http://blog.commtouch.com/cafe/email-security-news/advice-after-the-epsilon-breach/

Links and a little extra irony from me: http://chainmailcheck.wordpress.com/2011/04/07/epsilon-epidemic/

Update 2: a discomfiting suggestion that there was a longstanding problem that Epsilon were actually aware of: http://www.itnews.com.au/News/253712,epsilon-breach-used-four-month-old-attack.aspx (hat tip to Kurt Wismer, again)

Update: a few more articles you might find worth reading.

It’s reasonable to assume that the Epsilon fiasco will lead to an epidemic: at any rate, luminaries such as Brian Krebs and Randy Abrams are making that assumption, and publishing some excellent proactive advice accordingly. So rather than go over the same ground, I’ll just cite some of the more useful blog posts around that.

Two highly relevant posts by Brian Krebs:

And two relevant posts by Randy:

A list of companies known to have been affected from ThreatPost: http://threatpost.com/en_us/blogs/list-companies-hit-epsilon-breach-040511

And a characteristically to-the-point rant by Kurt Wismer on why it wouldn’t be an issue in a sane world: http://anti-virus-rants.blogspot.com/2011/04/why-epsilon-breach-shouldnt-be-issue.html

*Yes, a rather forced pun, I know. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Status_epilepticus 

David Harley CITP FBCS CISSP
AVIEN Dogsbody
ESET Senior Research Fellow



Japan Disaster: Commentary & Resources

[Further links added March 13th 2011 (and a couple more on the same day). Extra links and commentary appended March 14th. More commentary re the Bing chaintweet subsequently added. And yet more  on related scams added March 15th. More miscellaneous resources and commentary on 16th and 17th March. Additional links on 23rd March]

This is an attempt to bring together a number of disparate blogs highlighting resources I’ve been collecting over the past couple of days, relating to the Japanese earthquakes and tsunami. Apologies if there’s nothing here that’s new to you, but I think it’s important to spread this information as far as possible. This will now be my primary resource for putting up any further information I come across. I don’t, of course, claim that it will cover a fraction of the coverage that’s out there.

  • Some blogs of mine:
  • http://blog.eset.com/2011/03/11/japanese-earthquake-inevitable-seo 
  • http://chainmailcheck.wordpress.com/2011/03/12/earthquaketsunami-scam-resources/
  • http://blog.eset.com/2011/03/12/disaster-scams-and-resources
  • http://blog.eset.com/2011/03/11/disasters-getting-involved
  • And one more that I’ve referenced below…
  • Urban Schrott of ESET Ireland on do’s and don’t’s for safe browsing and disaster scam avoidance: http://esetireland.wordpress.com/2011/03/11/security-warning-japanese-earthquake-scams-will-send-tremors-through-the-web/
  • Paul Ducklin at Sophos on clickjacking by ibuzzu.fr: http://nakedsecurity.sophos.com/2011/03/12/japanese-tsunami-video-exploited-by-clickjackers/
  • Norman Ingal at Trend with some detail on observed BHSEO and fake AV: http://blog.trendmicro.com/most-recent-earthquake-in-japan-searches-lead-to-fakea/ 
  • Robert Slade at Securiteam with an older post (from the time of the Haiti earthquake – but still relevant) on training for disaster: http://blogs.securiteam.com/index.php/archives/1346
  • More analysis from Kimberley at stopmalvertising.com: http://stopmalvertising.com/blackhat-seo/recent-japanese-earthquake-search-results-lead-to-fakeav.html
  • Paul Roberts at Threat Post: http://threatpost.com/en_us/blogs/experts-warn-japan-earthquake-tsunami-spam-031111
  • Guy Bruneau at Internet Storm Center: http://isc.sans.edu/diary.html?storyid=10537&rss
  • Sean at F-Secure:  http://www.f-secure.com/weblog/archives/00002119.html 
  • Mike Lennon at Security Week: http://www.securityweek.com/massive-influx-scams-surrounding-japans-earthquake-and-tsunami-expected
  • spamwarnings.com is showing examples of spam related to this event: http://www.spamwarnings.com/tag/devastating-tsunami 
  • IRS online charities search: http://www.irs.gov/app/pub-78
  • Charity Navigator offers independent evaluation of charities: http://www.charitynavigator.org/
  • Google’s crisis response page: http://www.google.com/crisisresponse/japanquake2011.html
  • An old but much-to-the-point article on disaster scams from PC World: http://www.pcworld.com/article/61946/beware_of_online_scams_for_disasterrelief_funds.html
  • Phil Muncaster: http://www.v3.co.uk/v3-uk/news/2033668/google-twitter-facebook-step-help-japan-earthquake-survivors
  • Google’s People Finder service: http://japan.person-finder.appspot.com/?lang=en
  • Bing’s response page including several organizations offering relief initiatives: http://www.microsoft.com/about/corporatecitizenship/en-us/our-actions/in-the-community/disaster-and-humanitarian-response/community-involvement/disaster-response.aspx. A useful page, but there’s an aspect to Bing’s retweeting PR effort (see http://www.twitter.com/bing) that I can’t quite like, as explained at http://chainmailcheck.wordpress.com/2011/03/12/faith-hope-charity-and-manipulation/.
  • US-CERT: Japan Earthquake and Tsunami Disaster Email Scams, Fake Anitvirus and Phishing Attack Warning [Yes, the Anitvirus typo is on the web site: some useful links, nonetheless] 
  • Latest news from NHK World: http://www3.nhk.or.jp/nhkworld/ 
  • Graham Cluley: Japanese Tsunami RAW Tidal Wave Footage – Facebook scammers trick users with bogus CNN video
  • Morgsatlarge on Why I am not worried about Japan’s nuclear reactors
  • Real photos of the damage (hat tip to Rob Slade: http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2011/03/13/world/asia/satellite-photos-japan-before-and-after-tsunami.html?hp; http://www.cbc.ca/news/interactives/japan-earthquake/index.html. Not exactly security-related, but the sort of thing that’s being used to decoy people onto unsafe sites.
  • One from the Register that I missed at the time, though it’s basically a pointer to the Trend article above: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/03/11/japan_tsunami_scareware/
  • World Nuclear News: Battle to stabilise earthquake reactors
  • Lester Haines for The Register: Threat to third Fukushima nuke reactor: Authorities using seawater to battle overheating
  • Apparently I wasn’t the only person upset at Microsoft’s use of the disaster to promote Bing: BingDings* Force Change of Tune.
  • Here’s another clickjack scam brought to my attention by Graham Cluley: as he rightly says, it’s not likely to be the last. Japanese Tsunami Launches Whale Into Building? It’s a Facebook clickjack scam 
  • While Lewis Page describes in The Register how the Fukushima plant is actually performing “magnificently”, given the unexpected scale of the stress to which Japanese nuclear facilities have been subjected in the past few days: http://www.theregister.co.uk/2011/03/14/fukushiima_analysis/ Even if you’re not totally convinced that this is an argument for more nuclear powerplants, it’s certainly a welcome corrective to the FUD-exploiting scareware SEO that I suspect we’ll see over the next few days.
  • Graham Cluley on an SMS hoax: Fukushima radiation hoax SMS message spreads in Philippines (clue: it’s the hoax that’s spreading, not radiation…)
  • Nuclear Energy Institute: Information on the Japanese Earthquake and Reactors in That Region
  • Lester Haines: Fukushima reactor core battle continues: May be heading for meltdown, but no Chernobyl likely
  • Stan Schroeder for Mashable: AT&T, Verizon offer free calls and texts to Japan from US 
  • Ben Parr for Mashable:  Japan Earthquake & Tsunami: 7 Simple Ways to Help
  • Technet Blog: Microsoft Supports Relief Efforts in Japan
  • USA.answers.gov summary: Current Situation in Japan
  • Christopher Boyd, GFI Labs: Another “Whale smashes into building” Tsunami scam on Facebook 
  • Allan Dyer has mentioned that SMS “BBC FLASHNEWS” hoaxes like the one Sophos flagged at http://nakedsecurity.sophos.com/2011/03/14/fukushima-radiation-scare-hoax-text-message-spreads-in-philippines/ have also been circulating in Hong Kong.
  • Urban Schrott with some more scam info from Facecrook and elsewhere
  • Sophos on tsunami charity scams
  • Lots more links suggesting that radiation risk is way overblown, but I think we have enough of those to get the gist. Just be sceptical about alarmist reports that you can’t verify from reputable sites.
  • Business Standard on Cybercrime sets sail on tsunami sympathy
  • Symantec on Phishers Have No Mercy for Japan describing a fake American Red Cross donation site.
  • I’m also seeing a number of posts and articles suggesting that the situation regarding affected nuclear facilities is getting worse: I’m not qualified to separate fact and fiction in many of these cases, so I won’t try to track them here.
  • Allan Dyer describes one of the SMS hoaxes and a donation scam message pretending to be from AT&T: http://articles.yuikee.com.hk/newsletter/2011/03/a.html
  • Graham Cluley describes several Japan-related video links that actually lead to malicious javascript and a Java applet, plus some fake twitter email notifications: Spammed-out Japanese Tsunami video links lead to malware attack. See also Chet Wisniewski’s post SSCC 52 – Twitter HTTPS, net neutrality, car hacking, tsunami scams and Pwn2Own.
  • Jimmy Kuo forwarded a reliable donation link at at http://www.jas-socal.org/, and here’s a post from Tracy Mooney on charitable giving .
  • A series of other blogs from McAfee: http://blogs.mcafee.com/mcafee-labs/world-record-for-disaster-scam-site; http://blogs.mcafee.com/consumer/robert-siciliano/tsunami-scam-warnings-keep-coming-in; http://blogs.mcafee.com/consumer/consumer-threat-alerts/japan-earthquake-scams-spreading-quickly
  • Christopher Boyd on Japan “Miracle Stories” scams on Youtube… and Rogue AV results lurk in contamination comparison searches and ICRC Japan donation scam mails and .tk URLs offering surveys, installs and fake Tsunami footage and Tips for avoiding the endless Japan disaster files and A Japan-themed 419 scam…
  • Crawford Killian is tweeting a lot of more general Japan-related stuff that might be useful to you as background rather than as direct security stuff. http://twitter.com/Crof (hat tip to Rob Slade.)
  • Nicholas Brulez: Japan Quake Spam leads to Malware
  • John Leyden for The Register: Fake Japan blackout alerts cloak Flash malware: Scumbags continue to batten on human misery
  • Not directly security-related, but I can see it being used as a social-engineering hook: Timothy Prickett Morgan on Japanese quake shakes semiconductor biz: Boards and chip packages hit too.
  • An article by Amanda Ripley that has no direct security implication that I can see offhand, but I thought was interesting anyway: http://www.amandaripley.com/blog/japan_and_the_cliche_of_stoicism/
  • I probably won’t continue to add too many resources to this page that don’t have a direct and compelling security dimension, but if you are interested in the sort of footage of exploding reactors, tsunami hits and so on that blackhats use as bait for fake AV and clickjacking, the BBC has quite a few relevant videos: I know that because I watch the news. 🙂 I haven’t looked up individual links, but a quick Google search brings up several at http://www.bbc.co.uk/: no doubt searches of CNN etc. would bring up similar results. There’s lots of this stuff out there: no need to click on dubious links from unknown sources!

    David Harley CITP FBCS CISSP
    AVIEN COO
    ESET Senior Research Fellow

    

    AMTSO members’ workshop

    Don’t you hate it when people send you “reminders” meaning “here’s something I should have told you about before”?

    Well, here’s something that would have been a reminder if I’d actually blogged it here before. 🙂

    The next members meeting of AMTSO (the Anti-Malware Testing Standards Organization, a body whose intent to raise AV testing standards is very dear to the hearts of some of us here), is at San Mateo, California, on February 10th-11th.

    More details, including a preliminary agenda, at http://www.amtso.org/meetings.html.

    David Harley CITP FBCS CISSP

    (Intellectual) Property is Theft?*

    First of all, congratulations to Andrew Lee on his new role as CEO of ESET LLC. It’s as well that my work for AVIEN is unpaid, as otherwise he’d be my boss twice over. 😉 Reading the press release here, it includes substantial references to AVIEN and the AVIEN book, to which many AVIEN members contributed, as did Andrew and myself.

    That was a very worthwhile project, but one of the less attractive aspects was the readiness of a great many people to generate and distribute pirated copies: apparently the time and effort it took us all to generate that book doesn’t deserve any recompense. In fact, I had a pirated PDF copy sitting on my desktop before my author’s (hard) copies arrived…. That wasn’t the first of my books to be pirated, let alone the only one. But it seems that the pace has picked up in recent years.

    So imagine my joy on reading in the Vancouver Sun that ION Audio are about to market a device that can scan a 200-page book in 15 minutes. (Thanks to Robert Slade, my co-author on Viruses Revealed, for bringing this gem to my attention.) Well, it’s basically just a more ergonomic type of scanner, and hopefully dedicated pirates will find that having to turn all those pages by hand will still have a negative effect on their sex lives.

    I don’t think there’s much doubt, though, that for every individual who has a legitimate and possibly legal reason to scan one of their books into machine-readable form (i.e. for iPad, Kindle etc.), there will be many more who will see this as a way to profit from the labour of others without asking the question “why do I have the right to assume that authors should go through the pain of writing and publishing with no right to any sort of return?”

    What is really infuriating, though, is that it doesn’t seem to have occurred to ION that it is marketing rather more than a legitimate tool for honest students and educationalists. Or maybe it doesn’t care, because it can’t be used to copy ION hardware.

    * http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Property_is_theft

    David Harley CITP FBCS CISSP
    AVIEN COO

    Sick of Stuxnet?

    Even if you’re not thoroughly sick of the word Stuxnet, you may well be pretty confused as to what “the truth” about it is. I know I am…

    I think it will probably be a while before we get the whole picture, though there are a couple of last minute presentations scheduled for the Virus Bulletin conference in Vancouver next week that should be very interesting indeed: well, for sad Geeks like me, anyway. (I hope to see some of you there, maybe at the pre-drinks reception.)

    I’ve spent quite a lot of the past couple of weeks working with some colleagues from ESET on a Stuxnet paper (67 pages long, so you’d think I’d be all Stuxnetted out by now). While we can’t predict all the surprises those papers will unfold, there’s some fairly detailed analysis and some observations that go a little against the “cyberwar on Iran” flow. Stuxnet Under the Microscope, by Alexandr Matrosov, Eugene Rodionov, David Harley and Juraj Malcho, September 2010 is available on the ESET white papers page at http://www.eset.com/resources/white-papers/Stuxnet_Under_the_Microscope.pdf.

    David Harley CITP FBCS CISSP
    ESET Senior Research Fellow

    The edge of reason(ableness): AV Testing and the new creation scientists

    First, let me start out by saying that I am in a bad mood. I probably shouldn’t write when I’m in this mood, because I’m in danger of just ranting, but I’m going to anyway. I’m in a bad mood because I am pretty fed up that some people are so deliberately trying to destroy something I’ve personally (along with many others) worked very hard to build in the last couple of years.

    I’m in a bad mood because writing this is distracting me from the many other things that I need to do, and get paid to do.

    I’m in a bad mood because I’m fed up with hearing that I, and others like me, have no right to comment on things that fall directly within my realm of expertise (and goodness knows, that’s a narrow enough realm) – and that if I do, it’s simply self-interested nonsense.

    Secondly, let me also point out that although I’m now going to reveal that, yes, I’m talking about Anti-Malware Testing, and may mention AMTSO, I’m not speaking on behalf of AMTSO, nor my employer, nor anyone else, but me, myself and I (oh, that there were so many of us).

    So, “What’s the rumpus?*” Well, in what has become an almost unbelievable farce, the last few weeks have seen mounting attacks on the AMTSO group and what it does.

    For some background – those who are interested can read these articles.

    http://kevtownsend.wordpress.com/2010/06/27/anti-malware-testing-standards-organization-a-dissenting-view/

    http://krebsonsecurity.com/2010/06/anti-virus-is-a-poor-substitute-for-common-sense/

    There are some very good points in the second (Krebs) article, although cantankerous is not something that I would say characterizes AMTSO all that well – as Lysa Myers has pointed out ‘AMTSO is made of people‘, and I think the generally negative tone employed is a shame. The first (Townsend) article is way more problematic; there’s just so much wrong with Mr Townsend’s thinking that I don’t really know where to start. Fortunately, Kurt Wismer has already done a great job of responding here, and David Harley an equally competent job here.

    So why my response? Well, probably because I certainly am cantankerous.

    I’m also, almost uniquely in this industry (David Harley is another), formerly one of those “users” that Mr Townsend is so adamant should be controlling the process of AMTSO’s output – indeed, the whole of AVIEN was set up in the year 2000 as an organisation of interested, non-vendor employed, users – albeit users who knew something about anti-malware issues. We were users responsible for protecting large enterprises, who wanted to be able to share breaking anti-virus information without the interference of Vendors or the noise of such cesspools as alt.comp.virus. We wanted good, reliable information.

    I, like David Harley, later joined the industry as a Vendor, but I still understand what it is to be a user, and that was also a huge consideration in the setup of AMTSO – as so many have said before, and I want to reiterate here, bad testing of anti-virus products hurts everyone, the user most especially.

    However, this debate is much more than just one on which we can ‘agree to differ’  – like whether Germany or Spain has the better football team might be – it’s much more fudamental than that.

    Indeed, the only real analogy that comes close is that of the battle currently raging between the so called  faith based ‘science’ of creationists (let’s not prevaricate, Intelligent Design is just a euphemism for Creationism), and the research based science of evolutionary biologists and so on.

    On the one hand, you have anti-malware researchers, professional testers and so on; people who study malware every day, who constantly deal with the realities of malware exploiting users, and who understand better than anyone the challenges that we face in tackling malware – if you like, the “Richard Dawkinses of anti-malware” (though I certainly would not claim to match his eloquence nor intelligence) –  and on the other hand, we have those outside the industry who say that we’re all wrong, that we’re just a “self-perpetuating cesspool populated by charlatans” (yet none the less, a cesspool at which the media feeds most voraciously), that nobody needs AV, and that everything the AV community does or says is bunk.

    What I find so extraordinary (in both cases) is that those who are most in a position to provide trusted commentary on the subject are so ignored, in favour of those who have shrill, but ill-informed voices. Why is it that information from a tester; who may have just woken up one morning and decided to ‘test’ antivirus products; is taken on faith as being correct and true; and yet, when a group of professional people give up their time voluntarily, and work together to try to produce some documentation that sets out the ways in which anti-malware products can be tested effectively (and, no, that has nothing in particular to do with the WildList) and reliably, is it so violently decried as self-interested nonsense. It’s a terrible shame that science is so deliberately ignored in the face of popular opinion. Unfortunately, millions of people CAN be wrong, and often are.

    AMTSO is not about dictating truth, but rather pointing out ways in which truth can be reliably found (and importantly, where it cannot).

    I refuse to lie down and take it when someone tries to tell me that I’ve no right to point out the truth – and I’m not talking about truth based on some millenia old scripture, but real, hard, repeatable, scientifically verifiable, researched fact. If that makes me as unpopular as Richard Dawkins is to a creationist, then so be it.

    If you’re interested in understanding why anti-virus testing is so important (and why so many professional testers participate in AMTSO) then, please, do have a read of the AMTSO scriptures er… documents, here.

    Andrew Lee – AVIEN CEO, Cantankerous AV researcher.

    * If you’ve not seen the excellent movie “Miller’s Crossing” you won’t know where that quote comes from.

    (Thanks to Graham Cluley for pointing out that the first link didn’t go to the correct page.)

    New Mac Malware Resource

    Well, actually, it’s an old one. It’s at the Mac Virus site I kicked back into life a few months ago, primarily as a blog site.

    However, I’ve been under some pressure to restore some of the features of the old Mac Virus site. While I’ll be restoring some (more) of the pre-OSX stuff for its historical interest, I don’t see that as a big priority right now. But as I’ve been talking quite a lot about Mac threats in the past month or two (see http://macviruscom.wordpress.com/2010/05/13/apple-security-snapshots-from-1997-and-2010/ for example), there’s been curiosity about what we’ve been seeing in the way of OS X malware.

    Enter (stage left, with a fanfare of trumpets) the Mac Virus “Apple Malware Descriptions” Page at http://macviruscom.wordpress.com/apple-malware-descriptions/. Right now it consists of two descriptions of Mac scareware from 2008, so it’s at a very early stage of development. (It just happens to be those two descriptions because someone asked me about them yesterday.)

    Isn’t this stuff available elsewhere, I hear you ask? Of course it is. The point about these descriptions is that unlike most vendor descriptions, they point to various other sources of (reasonably dependable) information, as well as including a little personal commentary. It’s a first cut at attempting to answer the question “if there’s so much Mac malware around, where is it?”

    More later…

    David Harley CITP FBCS CISSP
    AVIEN Chief Operations Officer
    Mac Virus Administrator
    ESET Research Fellow and Director of Malware Intelligence

    Also blogging at:
    http://www.eset.com/blog
    http://smallbluegreenblog.wordpress.com/
    http://blogs.securiteam.com
    http://blog.isc2.org/
    http://dharley.wordpress.com
    http://macvirus.com
    http://amtso.wordpress.com/