Monthly Archives: August 2011

Geeks & Trojans

Actually, this has very little to do with Trojans, directly at any rate. My face is unlikely to launch a thousand ships (though it might sink a few), but my fingers have just launched a new blog at The Geek Peninsula which is intended (among other things) to address the frustrating fragmentation of outlets for my blogs and articles. Look upon it as the equivalent of the @DavidHarleyBlog Twitter account which flags pretty much everything I write, irrespective of who runs the platform, and in (approximately) real time.

What it won’t flag (at the moment, at any rate) is other people’s output. And stuff like the Japan tsunami resources blogs, which link to all sorts of relevant sources and resources, will continue to be flagged here.

David Harley CITP FBCS CISSP
Small Blue-Green World/AVIEN
ESET Senior Research Fellow

Be Prepared

…and ordinarily, there’d be a witty allusion here to Tom Lehrer, who used the same title for one of his songs, but there’s a very serious edge to this post.

The part of the world I live in is mostly spared (touch wood) the sort of dramatic, extreme disaster that I sometimes discuss here in the context of disaster-related scams, blackhat SEO and so forth. Even flooding in the often-rainsoaked UK lacks drama compared to the impact it has in other parts of the world. But it’s depressing to think how much of my security writing in recent years has related to criminal exploitation of the 2004 and other tsunami, earthquakes and so on, and at the beginning of September I’m addressing the topic again at the CFET 2011 conference in the UK.

Many of my friends, acquaintances and readers are rather more used to the risk and reality of earthquakes, tsunami, forest fire, eruptions and so on, not least those who are situated close to the Pacific “Ring of Fire”, which has 75% of the world’s active and dormant volcanoes and experiences 80% of its largest earthquakes, and includes most of the West coasts of North and South America. However, a glance at the links on the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s page at http://www.fema.gov/ demonstrates that the US population as a whole is at enough risk from national disasters to justify the existence of the National Prepared Month Coalition. AVIEN’s US subscribers may well want to think about supporting the initiative (it’s free, it isn’t restricted to USians, and it gives access to some resources you may find especially useful in the US).

The point I really want to get over here, though, is less this particular initiative (though AVIEN does support it as a member, so you may hear more of this from me) than the importance of training for disaster as a mindset that we can all benefit from, even if we don’t live too close for comfort to a major fault line, like my colleagues in San Diego. Disaster is a beast with many faces, and not all disasters are “natural”.

Tip of the hat to Robert Slade for turning my attention to the issue (not for the first time, of course) .

David Harley CITP FBCS CISSP
Small Blue-Green World/AVIEN
ESET Senior Research Fellow

Not even the end of an era

Well, not entirely, my last post notwithstanding.

Andrew Lee and I have been busily housekeeping and fitting various bits of ideas and web pages together over the last week or so, and have managed to keep more of the old site together than I originally anticipated. So I hope it won’t sound like I’m blowing my own trumpet if I say that that my last post wasn’t quite the Last Post after all. Or, indeed, the Flowers of the Forest.

I’m a little hard-pressed right now, but I’ll get back here with some more details. That doesn’t mean I won’t be making more use of the AVIEN Portal, but that won’t be with quite the same urgency.

David Harley CITP FBCS CISSP
Small Blue-Green World/AVIEN
ESET Senior Research Fellow